10th Grade Science Resources 

Jeannine Shields  Email: ny.den.leaders@gmail.com      Cell: 914-512-5124

Name of Resource

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Standard

HS-PS2-6. Communicate scientific and technical information about why the molecular-level structure is important in the functioning of designed materials.

HS-PS1-5. Apply scientific principles and evidence to provide an explanation about the effects of changing the temperature or concentration of the reacting particles on the rate at which a reaction occurs.

HS-LS2-7. Design, evaluate, and refine a solution for reducing the impacts of human activities on the environment and biodiversity.

HS-LS2-2. Use mathematical representations to support and revise explanations based on evidence about factors affecting biodiversity and populations in ecosystems of different scales.

Description

Students might perceive this as play, viewing a space shuttle simulation in space through a ViewMasterVR headset or Google Cardboard. But there is much content to explore behind the “Fun Facts” sections. You could draw connections to forces, life in small spaces, choices for equipment/items when only 24,000kg can be supported in payload. These virtual experiences could foster fabulous discussions among 10th graders to think and explore beyond the simulation/game.

Questions

*3 guiding questions for students to explore

Question 1 - How would you devise a plan for sharing the space in the cockpit? Allot a feasible share of physical space and time among the crew members.

  • Through the game students would discover that the crew cabin can serve up to 7 crew members at a time. Additional research such as from https://spaceflight.nasa.gov/shuttle/reference/basics/orbiter/index.html would inform students through inquiry that the crew module is 65.8-cubic-meter (2,325-cubic-foot). Students could be challenged to work out the math to figure out a share of resources. They would be completing lots of math and scientific thinking without realizing they were doing so.

Question 2 - How does the space shuttle compensate when minor corrections are required to flight path?

  • Through the VR experience students would learn that “The powerful main engines help get the space shuttle to orbit. There is also an orbital maneuvering system” - small rockets that help make small corrections to flight path. Further research would incorporate discussions regarding pushes and pulls/forces.

Question 3 - How is the space shuttle designed to protect astronauts as they encounter differences in temperature among the various atmospheres?

  • In the virtual reality, a factoid is shared, “The bottom is covered in Thermal Protection System Tiles. These protect from immense heat upon re-entry to the Earth’s atmosphere. This could lead students to discussions about why was the design tiles and not a coating? Do we have better materials available to us currently?

Name of Resource

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New York Times and “The NYT VR app was built in partnership with Secret Location, Mach1 and MPC. Apps powered by VUSR, VR sound powered by Mach1.”

Standard

HS-PS3-3. Design, build, and refine a device that works within given constraints to convert one form of energy into another form of energy.

HS-ESS3-2. Evaluate competing design solutions for developing, managing, and utilizing energy and mineral resources based on cost-benefit ratios.*

Description

Experience award-winning virtual reality films by New York Times journalists in an immersive 360-degree video experience. New experiences will be posted roughly monthly. There are several 360 VR experiences that could be useful to 10th grade Science classes. Once such case is the “Dark Island: Rebuilding Puerto Rico’s Grid.” Students would have the opportunity to more readily put themselves in the shoes of those living in Puerto Rico without power for the last few months. Concepts of power grid design and outdated equipment and correct size of couplings are addressed in the video.

Questions

*3 guiding questions for students to explore

Question 1 - How would your life be different without access to electric power for 6 months? Perhaps students could make a chart of daily activities they currently perform and analyze if they could still participate or would that action/activity be put on hold

  • Hopefully students could identify and classify activities such as computer use, TV watching, reading by lamp would be impossible. But activities such as reading outside by sunlight would remain possible

Question 2 - Challenge: design an alternative source of energy that could temporarily assist those living without electric power.

  • Perhaps students would devise something with solar power, kinetic power, or other solutions

Question 3 - Discuss why workers from Wisconsin are working on utilities in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Cite examples from further research regarding the cost benefit analysis of sending crews from mainland US to Puerto Rico.

  • Upon further research 10th graders might discover that several medications are manufactured in Puerto Rico. And additionally that Puerto Rico is home to parts of the Over the Horizon radar system. The island itself was already in debt before the storms. Hopefully this engaging 360 experience would encourage students to look further and compare data regarding work travel to Puerto Rico and transportation costs vs the goods and services provided by the technologies and scientific communities available in Puerto Rico. Sample source: https://psmag.com/economics/puerto-rico-is-essential-to-the-us-economy-and-military

Name of Resource

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Standard

HS-ETS1-3. Evaluate a solution to a complex real-world problem based on prioritized criteria and trade-offs that account for a range of constraints, including cost, safety, reliability, and aesthetics, as well as possible social, cultural, and environmental impacts.

Description

This DiscoveryVR clip takes the viewer on a tour through the Redwoods in Muir Woods, California. Look up, see the vastness of the Redwood trees. Hear the animals in their natural habitat. Look down, see and hear the crunch of the leaves. There is a wooden bridge to walk across and explore. Walk Among Giants could serve as a stepping off point for a design challenge involving bridges. I would inform students that they are going on a digital scavenger hunt to discover what they will be building in the challenge (a bridge the incorporates equity in its design). I would frame the activity as a challenge.

Questions

*3 guiding questions for students to explore

Question 1 - “We have been challenged by our Park Foundation to help facilitate greater access to our local parks. Please use the Discovery VR app to put yourself in the place of other visitors to their park. Look around while reflecting on other people’s points of views. What parts of nature might capture their eye? What might be problematic to their explorations?

  • Students might respond: sun shining through branches, shadows, brook, plants, massively tall Redwoods. Travel over twigs and leaves may prove hazardous for some to navigate

Question 2 - What wooden structure does this park have to help others navigate? What strengths do you see to it’s design? What factors do you think they considered about the nature around it when creating this structure? What information can you find from other sources that support their effort to provide greater access? You will create a Google Slide on your findings.

Question 3 - Based on what you have learned, what factors would we need to consider to make our park more accessible to others? Create another slide with those concepts highlighted.

Challenge: Design a structure and landscape that would balance both the natural aspects of the area in the park and provide equitable access for most residents to enjoy. You may build with any materials that you choose for the prototype.

Final Slide: Discuss the materials that would be used to create the structure and landscape design. Durability should be considered as well as other trade-offs in these budgetary times.

  • Students might respond: We need smooth, flat surfaces where canes or chair wheels will not get stuck. Inclines and declines should be addressed. Sustainable materials as well as weatherproof materials should be balanced against cost analysis.

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Standard

HS-ESS1-1. Develop a model based on evidence to illustrate the life span of the sun and the role of nuclear fusion in the sun’s core to release energy that eventually reaches Earth in the form of radiation.

HS-ESS1-4. Use mathematical or computational representations of phenomena to describe explanations.

HS-ESS2-4. Use a model to describe how variations in the flow of energy into and out of Earth’s systems result in changes in climate.

HS-ESS3-5. Analyze geoscience data and the results from global climate models to make an evidence-based forecast of the current rate of global or regional climate change and associated future impacts to Earth’s systems.

Description

The Seeker VR Team sent a weather balloon to “explore space”. They recorded the flight to share with students and other learners. In post production, they added the sensor readings from the various instrument panels that were included in the weather balloon. It is fascinating to watch the temperature change as the altitude and speed changes in the weather balloon. Towards the end of the video after a journey of nearly 114,000 feet from the Earth’s surface, the equipment gave way and our data collection must stop. But a viewer can experience sleet and snow by looking up at a certain point in the activity. Students can virtually travel higher than Mount Everest even though the Oxygen is too scarce to support human life.

Questions

*3 guiding questions for students to explore

Question 1 - Participate in the VR experience once, what do you notice happens to the instrument readings on the superimposed sensor displays?

  • Students may respond: As altitude increases so does speed. Temperature decreases.

Question 2 - Re-play the experience and track the changes of altitude and temperature in a chart to compare data. What happened around the 4 minute mark in the video? What do you think might have caused that to occur? Could you design a better method of recording this data from our atmosphere?

  • Students may respond: Creating a chart tracking altitude, temperature and speed.

Students may recognize that around the 4 minute mark the equipment malfunctions. Student solutions may vary.

Question 3 - The VR experience discusses sleet and snow in relation to air temperature and the human need for a spacesuit when there is a 90% lower air pressure. If our current Earth climate continues to change unhampered, what predictions can you make about our future? What solutions can you determine that might help slow this process or adapt humans to the process?

  • Students may respond: Noting that as the air pressure lowers humans cannot breathe on their own. If this happens at lower altitudes like ground level, this would have a serious impact on human life. Their possible solutions will vary.